Pain Pill Addiction Stories: An Addict's Apology

Pain Pill Addiction StoriesI’m dedicating my success story to all the families and friends of alcoholics and addicts. I want to let you know, as loved ones, that we are so incredibly sorry for everything we’ve put you through. Even if we haven’t expressed it yet, we are sorry for the worrying, the sleepless nights, broken promises and stealing of money and time. We’re sorry for ruining holidays and special occasions and the embarrassment we’ve caused. We’re sorry for all of the pain, arguments and stress. Please understand that we never intended to hurt you.

 

I also want to let you know that this was never a failure of willpower. Those of us who have been burdened with addiction know it’s a disease of the brain. It’s not an excuse for our behavior, but, I want to let you know that drugs and alcohol are capable of completely controlling the brain and all of our actions. Our addicted brains tell us that we need our drug of choice for survival, no matter what the consequences. We will do anything for these substances, because our disease is telling us that without, we will die. It takes some pretty powerful treatment to rewire the brain.

 

I was ready to rewire my brain when I came to Arapahoe House’s Healing First program more than two years ago. I accepted the excruciating withdrawals from pain pills and worked hard in my 28 days of treatment. I soaked up all the knowledge I could from the counselors. I dove into the education about an addict’s brain and genetics. I started to understand what was causing me to use and learned how to conquer cravings and handle triggers. I got healthy, started a new life in recovery and haven’t looked back since.

 

To all the friends and family of alcoholics and addicts, I know you’ve had it with us. Deep down we understand that you might need to create boundaries with us and go to AlAnon meetings for support. Thank you, families and friends, for bearing with us as we try and beat this disease. Recovering from addiction might seem impossible, but treatment really does work and there is hope. There is nothing like Arapahoe House and I couldn’t have changed my story without this organization.